George Abraham Gibbs of Pytte

Born1718
Died1794 Clyst St George
FatherAbraham Gibbs of Topsham (1686 – 1726)
MotherMary Moncke (1686 – 1722)
OccupationHe succeeded in 1744 to Pytte and other property in Clyst St. George as heir at law (after his father) to his great uncle George Gibbs. Surgeon (eventually chief surgeon) at the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Exeter, from 1747 to 1781.

Life Events

1718Born
1722Death of mother Mary Moncke
1726Death of father Abraham Gibbs of Topsham
1747Married Anne Vicary of Dunkeswell in St Petrock, Exeter
1748Birth of son George Gibbs
1750Death of son George Gibbs
1750Birth of daughter Elizabeth Gibbs
1751Birth of son Right Hon Sir Vicary Gibbs
1753Birth of son George Gibbs of Redland
1754Birth of son Abraham Gibbs
1756Birth of son Antony Gibbs
1757Birth of daughter Anne Gibbs
1759Birth of daughter Mary Gibbs
1760Birth of daughter Sibella Gibbs
1763Birth of daughter Sarah Gibbs
1767Birth of daughter Catherine Gibbs
1780Death of daughter Elizabeth Gibbs
1782Death of son Abraham Gibbs
1785Death of daughter Sarah Gibbs
1794Died

Biography and Notes

George Abraham Gibbs of Pytte succeeded in 1744 to Pytte and other property in Clyst St. George as heir at law (after his father) to his great uncle George Gibbs, by arranging for the ending of a tenancy to the family of Rev. F. Pease, rector of the parish, created under dispositions made by the said George. In 1749 that family also transferred to him 15 acres in Clyst St. Mary (part of the "Manor of Ashmore") which were subject to the charitable charges which the same George had imposed on them. He bought Court Place in Clyst St. George, made 100 acres in that parish. He was a Presbyterian in the early part of his life. In October 1745 he was enrolled in an Association of Exeter men in support of the King against the Young Pretender. He was one of the surgeons (eventually chief surgeon) of the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Exeter from 1747 to 1781, and thereafter on its standing committee. His residence in Exeter during his married life was in Palace Yard, Cathedral Close. Becoming bankrupt in 1789 through the failure of business in which he was engaged with his son Antony, he lost all his property in Clyst St. George and Clyst St. Mary, including Pytte, which was bought in 1790 by his son-in-law, Rev. Charles Crawley. He used the arms of Gibbs of Fenton like his great uncle George and his cousins of Exeter.